The Women Who Didn’t Get the Vote in 1918

WebRoots Democracy has an event on 20 February that may be of interest – see https://nvite.com/eb/42455897733

WebRoots Democracy event
WebRoots Democracy event

 

Intersectional Suffrage: A focus on the women that didn’t get the vote in 1918.

2018 marks the centenary of the first women in the UK being allowed to vote. The 1918 Representation of the People Act allowed women over the age of 30 to vote provided they were university graduates, had certain property rights, or were married to men who had certain property rights. Ten years later, the 1928 Representation of the People Act provided electoral equality, allowing all women over the age of 21 to vote, regardless of property rights.

Join us on the 20th of February as we learn more about the women who were denied the vote in 1918 and to explore current voting behaviour and political representation across class, gender, and ethnic divides in 2018.

Speakers:

Dawn Butler MP – Shadow Secretary of State for Women and Equalities
Cllr Abena Oppong Asare – London Borough of Bexley and Labour Women’s Network
Neema Begum – PhD Researcher (Ethnicity and Voting Behaviour), University of Bristol
Rachael Gibbons – Programme Lead (Working Class Heroes), RECLAIM Project

Chair: Fahmida Rahman – WebRoots Democracy

Further speakers to be announced.

Spaces are limited and your name will need to be on the guestlist in order to attend.

Stay updated and follow WebRoots Democracy on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram.

Hotlines List Update

The Hotlines List was updated on 12 February 2018

As always, please ensure that you are using the current version of the hotlines list on the intranet, as copies saved to your computer may be out of date.

Please go here to see the new information (you need to have an intranet login to access this page).

You are invited to take part in EqualiTeas

You are invited to take part in EqualiTeas (18 June-2 July 2018) a UK-wide celebration of our democratic equality that will mark the 90th anniversary of the Representation of the People Act 1928 in which all people were given the right to vote on an equal basis.

Hold an event or activity

Anyone can hold an EqualiTeas party! Your EqualiTeas event or activity can take any form you would like. It can be big or small, private or public, inside or out! As long as it brings your community together to explore what equality means to people. Pop on the kettle, make a cup of your favourite brew, and have a chat about why you value equality and what it means to you.

Free EqualiTeas pack

Register your EqualiTeas event today and receive a free event pack which includes:

• tablecloth board game
• pack of debate cards
• party banner
• selfie placard
• badges
• cookie cutter and recipe card

We have 4000 packs to be claimed, register for yours before they have gone.

Who we are

EqualiTeas has been developed by the Houses of Parliament as part of its Education and Engagement Service. It is part of Vote 100 which marks 100 years since Parliament passed a law which allowed the first women, and all men, to vote for the first time: the Representation of the People Act 1918.

https://equaliteas.org.uk/

Working Group on an Independent Complaints and Grievance Policy

Evening Standard 8 Feb

In November,  the Prime Minister convened a cross-party Working Group to establish a new independent complaints and grievance procedure, in response to reports of sexual harassment and bullying in parliament.

The group’s report was published today and can be read on the Parliament website. It has attracted a lot of press coverage: