Banner – Equipment for returning to the workplace

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Our office supplier, Banner, has published a catalogue of equipment to allow MPs and staff to return to the workplace safely, including:

  • preparing the building
  • equipping the workforce
  • controlling access to sites
  • implementing a social distancing plan
  • reducing virus transfer

You can view the catalogue here: https://www.easyflip.co.uk/BannerReturntotheWorkplace/

Constituency office risk assessments

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The House has produced a risk assessment and guidance to support Members in safely re-opening constituency offices.

The guidance advises Members to consider whether it is necessary to open constituency offices and if so provides practical guidance on the steps to take to ensure the safety of Members, their staff and others.

For any questions regarding this guidance, please contact the Parliamentary Safety Team on
safety@parliament.uk.

Security at Westminster and in Constituency Offices

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As you’d like to hope, Parliament has about the best security and emergency planning of any place to work in the country.  This Guide can’t tell you everything (for security reasons of course!) but can point security-cleared staff in the right direction if you’d like more information on the procedures in place to keep our workplace safe.

There are well developed mechanisms to deal with all kinds of events, not only terrorist attacks, but incidents such as floods and fires of varying seriousness.

The main objective of these contingency plans is to ensure safety and security, and business continuity plans also exist to ensure that Parliament can continue to sit even if it’s not possible to do so in the Chambers.  It’s also very important that proceedings continue to be broadcast so that the public can see business carrying on as usual.

Every Member of Parliament and their staff, including constituency staff, must undergo annual mandatory training on Security Awareness, which can be accessed through the ACT learning portal.

Topics:

  1. Threat Levels
  2. What to do in the event of:
    Losing your pass;
    Suspect packages;
    Seeing something/someone suspicious;
    Receiving a bomb threat.
  3. Contingency Planning and Business Continuity 
  4. Personal Security
  5. Communication
  6. A Note on Security in Constituency Offices
  7. Harassment or threats from constituents
  8. And finally….
  9. Useful links

1. Threat Levels

National Terrorism Threat Levels – decided by MI5 and the Joint Terrorism Analysis Centre

  • Low – an attack is unlikely
  • Moderate – an attack is possible, but not likely
  • Substantial – an attack is a strong possibility
  • Severe – an attack is highly likely
  • Critical – an attack is expected imminently (used after 2001 attacks on the US, 2005 London bombings and the attempted car bombings in London and at Glasgow airport in June and July 2007).

The annunciators will tell you what the current threat level is, as will the Intranet

Response Levels here in Parliament

  • Normal – Routine protective security measures appropriate to the Parliamentary Estate
  • Heightened – additional and sustainable protective security measures reflecting the broad nature of the threat to the Parliamentary Estate combined with specific vulnerabilities and judgements on acceptable risk
  • Exceptional – Maximum protective security measures to meet specific threats and to minimise vulnerability and risk

2. What to do in the event of …..

Losing your pass – immediately report this to the Pass Office on x5920.  They will cancel it straight away to ensure it can’t be used by anyone else, and issue you a new pass.

While we’re on the subject of passes, always wear your pass in the Parliamentary precincts but take it off as soon as you leave the Estate and put it somewhere safe where it can’t be seen for the journey home.  Displaying your pass outside of the Parliamentary Estate could make you a target.

It is not permitted for anyone to work whilst on a visitor pass, not even an Intern awaiting security clearance.  Everyone must be security cleared before they start.

Suspect packages – Never ask people to address your post to your specific building or room number – always tell them to address it to House of Commons, London, SW1A 0AA.

All packages are scanned off site before they arrive on the Estate, but all staff who are required to open mail in the course of their work should bear in mind the possibility of receiving dangerous items or substances.  In 2005, packages were detected addressed to Ministers in their Commons offices which turned out to contain a mixture of sugar and weed killer.  Look out for:

  • grease marks on the envelope or wrapping
  • an unusual odour
  • visible wiring or tin foil
  • if it feels very heavy for its size
  • delivered by hand or from an unknown source, or posted from an unusual place
  • excessive wrapping
  • too many stamps for the weight of the package

In the event of receiving a suspicious package or letter:

  • do not attempt to open it, bend it, squeeze it or tamper with it in any way
  • do not place it in anything (including water) or cover it
  • put it down gently on a dry, flat surface and walk away from it
  • evacuate the immediate room or area and call security on x3333

Seeing something/someone suspicious – immediately contact security on x3333

Receiving a bomb threat

  • Do not put the handset down or cut off the conversation.
  • If possible, try and alert someone else to alert Security Control while you stay on the line.
  • Obtain as much information from the caller as you can and try and keep them on the line. For example, pretend it’s a bad line and ask the caller to speak up.
  • On page 5 of the telephone directory there is a form for you to complete as you talk to try and obtain useful information – if you can’t get to the form, try and remember the message and ask the following about the bomb threat – Where is it?  What time will it go off?  What does it look like?  What kind of bomb is it?  Who are you and why are you doing this?
  • Once you’ve got information about the time and place, try to get as much detail about the caller as you can.

3. Contingency Planning and Business Continuity

There are plans in place to deal with all kinds of events, not just terrorist attacks but incidents such as floods and fires of varying seriousness.  The main objective of these contingency plans is to ensure safety and security.  Rehearsals for MPs, for example what to do in the event of a chemical attack in the Commons Chamber, take place every so often and you should encourage your MP to attend!

Business continuity plans are an even bigger job and are vital to ensure that Parliament can continue to sit even if it’s not possible to do so in the Chambers. There are temporary locations to which Parliament would reconvene if the Palace were to be unsafe, where facilities such as the Table Office and Vote Office could be set up.

It’s also very important that proceedings continue to be broadcast so that the public can see business carrying on as usual.

4. Personal Security

The latest version of the Members’ Personal Safety Leaflet is now available on the intranet.  This is not just for Members; it’s vital that their staff read it as well. W4MP can’t emphasise strongly enough the importance of your reading this and taking appropriate action.

This 7-page leaflet (direct link to the PDF here) provides detailed information for Members on personal safety and that of family and staff. It covers:

  • Running a safe surgery
  • Obtaining additional physical security advice
  • Financial support for security measures
  • Getting Support from the Fixated Threat Assessment Centre (FTAC) – see section 7, below
  • Members’ Home Security
  • Suspicious Post and Packages
  • IT Security Matters

The Members’ Security Support Service in the Parliamentary Security Department is available to provide support and advice on personal security, social media security and security measures in constituency offices.  You can contact them on x2244 or at safe@parliament.uk.

5. Communication

In the event of an emergency, alerts will be shown on the annunciators, a prolonged division will ring and the voice-over system will give advice.  MPs will be paged, and email will be used for updates but not for immediate instructions.

6. A Note on Security in Constituency Offices

Parliament will provide reasonable security measures free of charge for constituency offices.

This might cover, for example

  • Minor building works to the office/surgery venue
  • Purchase, lease, installation, monitoring and/or maintenance of security equipment for use in the office/surgery – e.g. alarm systems, shutters, CCTV, personal alarms for staff

In the meantime, a useful measure can be for staff to have an ‘office code’ for a potentially dangerous or disruptive situation.  A constituency office I worked in has a code for calling the police in the event of a violent visitor – the Secretary would call to the caseworker in the back room, “could you get the Blue File please?!”

The Members’ Security Support Service can assist with the process of arranging security assessments and getting recommended measures installed in constituency offices.  Contact them about starting the process, or to discuss any issues you’re experiencing with getting measures installed.  Call them on x2244 or email safe@parliament.uk for further information.

7. Harassment and Threats from Constituents

If you are being harassed by constituents the first thing to understand is that you are not alone.  Every MP’s office – and this has greatest significance for constituency office staff – suffers harassment from time to time.  We don’t mean the ‘normal’ day to day pressure of work; what we are talking about is threatening behaviour either by phone or by email or in person.

Don’t hesitate to seek the advice of your local Police on security measures.  It’s best to do this BEFORE any trouble starts so you are prepared when it does.

W4MP has a couple of guides with information you may find helpful and these are here:

http://www.w4mp.org/library/guides/researchguides/your-mp-basic-info/members-and-constituency-etiquette-vital-guide/, and
http://www.w4mp.org/library/guides/2010-guide-to-working-for-an-mp-for-new-staff/how-to-survive-your-first-ten-days-in-the-constituency-office/.  This one is a bit out of date but still very useful.

If you are still concerned, your first port of call is the Serjeant at Arms Office on x3030.  They will advise on whether you need help from the Fixated Threat Assessment Centre (FTAC).  Read this next section NOW so you know what support is available.  Although a lot of the information is aimed at Members, it is entirely appropriate for their staff too.  Here it is:

INAPPROPRIATE COMMUNICATIONS OR HARASSMENT

It is part of the role of a Member of Parliament to deal with constituents’ problems, both in writing and face-to-face.  Members attract the attention of a range of people, including some with persistent grievances or strange personal causes and some of whom are mentally ill.  Most such individuals cause no problems and are unlikely to constitute more than a nuisance.  However, Members are occasionally troubled by more threatening or intrusive attentions from people which cause anxiety or concern.  In some cases, this amounts to persistent harassment.

The Fixated Threat Assessment Centre (FTAC) was established to assist with these issues.  It is a joint Police-NHS unit which specialises in the assessment and management of people who engage in inappropriate or intrusive contacts towards public figures.  It offers specialist assistance, intervention and support to Members, in collaboration with the Serjeant-at-Arms and the Palace of Westminster Police.

GETTING SUPPORT FROM THE FTAC

The FTAC will consider cases where intrusive behaviour is causing particular concern or distress or is perceived as harassing or threatening.  Potential cases for FTAC should be discussed with the Serjeant at Arms.

Constituency offices are encouraged to maintain a good relationship with their local Police as they can often provide them with security advice that is tailored to their needs, taking into account any local threats.

8. And finally ….

If you’d like more information on what the Contingency and Business Continuity Plans are, contact the Serjeant at Arms who is happy to give talks to staff groups.

Please remember that security is a matter for all of us.  If you see someone or something suspicious, contact the police or security staff.  Better a well intentioned mistake than ignoring something potentially disastrous.

Make sure you get a House of Commons Emergency Card – you can get one from the Pass Office.  It shows the Emergency Information Telephone Number which, in the event of an emergency, will issue a recorded message of advice which will be constantly updated as the situation changes.  There is also a website which will be activated in the case of emergency, to which you can log in for advice and updates.  General emergency advice and procedures can be found here: https://intranet.parliament.uk/access-buildings/evacuation-emergencies/emergencies/

In the event of an emergency, DO NOT report or even mention it on social media – you could endanger others by doing so.

Last, but not least, the security staff are here to ensure our safety and so please be nice and polite to them, especially at times of heightened security measures when getting in and out of the buildings can take a bit longer.

9. Useful links:

This note has been prepared with the assistance and approval of the Parliamentary Security Department.

Setting Up the Office

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Setting up the Office

2.1  Choosing the right office(s)
2.2  Furniture, Equipment and Stationery
2.3  Computers
2.4  Email
2.5  Data Registration
2.6  Confidentiality
2.7  Involving Volunteers, Work Experience Students, Interns
2.8  Registering Interests
2.9  Health and Safety Policy for constituency offices
2.10 Dealing with post and deliveries


2.1 Choosing the right office(s)

The tasks performed by MPs’ staff include: research, providing briefings; drafting speeches and articles; casework, including handling letters, emails and calls; press and political work; diary and engagements; and keeping accounts.  Alright, so you do 101 other things as well, but the functions listed above, and who does them, will have a strong bearing on where any MP decides to locate his/her staff.

The choice is clearly between basing the office in Westminster or in the constituency – or a mixture of the two – and there are examples of every permutation.  Given the flexible tools of information technology, there are many tasks which could as well be done up a mountain as at Westminster, but the overriding considerations will be convenience and accessibility.  For example, having access to all the resources at Westminster and also having a visible presence in the constituency.

Here are some questions MPs will wish to answer before choosing the location(s) of their office(s):

  • Do you want constituents to have walk-in access to your staff?  (NB: please consider the security of you and your staff – see our brief comments on security in Section 3.9 on Advice Surgeries in our Everyday Tasks Guide)
  • Do you want to locate your staff in the office of your local constituency party?
  • Do you want to share with a neighbouring MP?
  • Is it most convenient to have a researcher at Westminster?  What happens to this role during parliamentary recesses?
  • Can all press contacts be adequately handled in the constituency?
  • Where is the most efficient place to locate your diary-keeper?
  • Is it possible to handle casework satisfactorily at Westminster?

In your office on the Parliamentary estate at Westminster, phone calls, rent, furniture, cleaning, photocopying costs are not charged to your Office Costs Budget; but you will have to pay for them all (and more) in your constituency office.

New MPs are entitled to a start-up budget, to enable them, amongst other things, to set up a constituency office.

Before you can claim any costs associated with your constituency office, including rent, you must register that property with IPSA.  Further details can be found in the ‘Guidance for MPs’ Business Costs and Expenses’, the latest version of which can be found on the IPSA website.

2.2 Furniture and Equipment and Stationery

At Westminster, standard furniture is provided at no cost.  In the constituency, however, you will have to buy it, although you can use the start-up budget for this.

The biggest items of expense will probably be those unlovely objects, filing cabinets.  Filing is dealt with in more detail further on, but do try to resist the temptation to provide a home for every single scrap of paper that enters your office on the grounds that it-might-come-in-useful-one-day.  With most information available online now, the ability to scan documents, and the wonderful backup from the Commons Library, you can confidently consign 99% of all that bumph to your paper recycling box.  So buy as few good quality filing cabinets as possible and consider looking for bargains in second-hand furniture warehouses.

Desks, chairs, lamps, phones, filing trays, shelving, and all the other bits and pieces you will need can also be found in second-hand places but it’s worth comparing prices with those in the House of Commons preferred stationery supplier’s catalogue which you should have already, or can be found online here: http://www.bbanner.co.uk/  Your Member should have been sent login details already.  If not, please give their helpdesk a call.  Most items are delivered next-day.

If you need any workplace adjustments, please see this guide: http://www.w4mp.org/w4mp/w4mp-guides/workplace-adjustments/

USE OF HOUSE STATIONERY AND POST PAID ENVELOPES (Serjeant at Arms)

Please see here for the current rules on the use of House stationery and post-paid envelopes.

2.3 Computers

Each Member is entitled to loan computers, laptops, mobile devices and printers from Parliament.  The catalogue can be found on the intranet, or you can ask for advice by ringing the Parliamentary Digital Service helpdesk on x2001.

The Parliamentary Digital Service will also arrange for a free broadband installation at the constituency office and you can find more information about that here.

Please note that computers supplied by Parliament are only accessible by people who have security clearance.  Without it, you cannot even log onto a machine.  Therefore, it is very important that new staff apply for their security clearance as soon as possible, in order to avoid delays in getting network access.

Don’t forget to purchase a television licence for your constituency office.  Even if you don’t have a television in your constituency office, you will still need a licence if you watch live TV on your computer or any mobile devices, or download any programmes from BBC iPlayer.  You can find further information here: https://www.tvlicensing.co.uk/check-if-you-need-one and purchase a licence here: https://www.tvlicensing.co.uk/cs/pay-for-your-tv-licence/index.app  You can pay for it on your IPSA card.  You do not need to purchase a television licence for your Westminster office as this is covered by the House authorities.

2.4 Email

The vast majority of MPs’ correspondence comes in by email, and you may be surprised at just how many emails arrive every day – it can often be in the hundreds, so it is important that you agree with your Member how you are going to deal with them.  Some MPs give their staff ‘delegated access’ to their inboxes, which allows staff to monitor and respond to emails on their behalf.  Some MPs have two mailboxes, one of which is accessible by their staff, and one which remains private.  Having a second mailbox can be very useful, for example, if you want to use one specifically for casework.  It is very easy to drag and drop emails between the two mailboxes, if required.

Many Government departments and agencies also have special MP ‘hotline’ email addresses, which are extremely useful.  There is a list of hotlines on the Parliamentary intranet.

2.5 Data Protection Registration

Under the requirements of the Data Protection Act 2018, all MPs’ offices must register with the Information Commissioner.  It is quite a straightforward process and the people who deal with enquiries at the Information Commissioner’s office are very helpful.  Members of Parliament are exempt from paying a registration fee, unless they have CCTV such as a video-entry doorbell which records the images, in which case the £40 fee applies.  You can ring their Information Line on 0303 123 1113 (local rate) or  01625 545 745 (national rate).

You can register online or email them for further information.  Their postal address is Information Commissioner, Wycliffe House, Water Lane, Wilmslow, Cheshire  SK9 5AF.   Further information can be found on the Information Commissioner’s website at: https://ico.org.uk/ and there is specific guidance for Constituency casework of Members of Parliament and the processing of sensitive personal data.

Importantly, the ICO’s guidance includes information on whether or not the constituent’s consent is required for them to act.  It says:

“For non-sensitive personal data, Members can usually rely on the implied consent of the constituent as providing the necessary condition.

For sensitive personal data, members can usually rely on the The Data Protection (Processing of Sensitive Personal Data)(Elected Representatives) Order 2002, which also covers the disclosure of such data by organisations responding to Members.”

You can find further guidances on Data Protection on the intranet: https://intranet.parliament.uk/information-management/data-protection-security/data-protection/

There is an excellent House of Commons Library briefing paper on Data Protection and Constituency Casework  which looks at the General Data Protection Regulation, the Data Protection Act 2018, and when MPs can process personal information.

2.6 Confidentiality

Working for an MP involves daily access to confidential information, both political and private.  It should be treated as such and protected from unauthorised disclosure.  Your constituents expect you to deal sensitively and appropriately with any personal information they give you.  Being given confidential information about a constituent can sometimes put you in a tricky situation.  Let’s look at three examples.

A constituent has asked you to contact the Home Office to speed up an application for his wife to join him in this country.  After interminable and inexplicable delays, an Immigration Officer reveals to you over the phone that the reason for the delay is that the wife is being investigated for deception.  This will involve an investigative trip to a remote part of her home country and there will be further delays; he asks you not to reveal this to your constituent.  Meanwhile, your constituent is ringing you three times a week to check progress.

Another example: your MP has written to Social Services on behalf of constituents who say they are being unfairly prevented from having reasonable access to their children who are in a foster home at present.  You receive two replies: one repeating the line that there is an agreement, made in court, that access is only allowed in tightly supervised conditions.  The other reply, marked “Confidential”, informs you that the children have made allegations of sexual abuse against one of their parents, which are currently being investigated.

A third example: you receive an anonymous email (so you can reply to it but you have no idea of the name or postal address of the sender) claiming that a named person is defrauding the Benefits Agency and asking you to pass on this information.

You need to discuss with your MP how you deal with these situations.  It is also important that, despite the pressures on your time, you read all letters from constituents and replies from agencies carefully before forwarding them.  Sometimes you will get what appears to be a very forthright or stark response for forwarding to a constituent.  Don’t underestimate the value of your role in achieving clarity (light but not sweetness, perhaps) for constituents; the unvarnished truth can sometimes help them to move on.

Only in exceptional circumstances should you pursue an issue for a constituent if it has been brought to your attention by someone else: a neighbour or a relative, for example.  Always get the permission (preferably in writing) of the person whose problem you are being asked to help resolve.  Here’s an example of a permission form.

Permission Form

NAME [Please print]________________________________________________________

National Insurance No: _____________________________________________________

ADDRESS _________________________________________________________________

I have instructed my Member of Parliament [NAME] to act on my behalf in this matter and would be grateful if any correspondence or documents could be sent to the address of my MP.
I confirm that I have given my MP permission to pursue these matters and to use all information I have provided, whether written or spoken, and including sensitive personal information.
I understand that this will be done in line with the requirements of the Data Protection Act 2018.

SIGNED___________________________________________________________________

DATE_____________________________________________________________________

2.7 Involving Volunteers, Work Experience Students and Interns

Given that anyone wishing to use a computer must have security clearance, this means that any short-term volunteers or work experience students must not be allowed to use them.  You need to consider this requirement when agreeing to any such positions, and you should never share log in details.  Additionally, anyone who will be working on the Parliamentary Estate must get a Parliamentary pass, even if they’ll only be there for a day or two.   Most pass applications are processed in 5 working days, so get the application in as early as you can, but a few weeks in advance should be fine.

There may be problems about the use of volunteers in any office where paid staff are working, but most of us reckon that, despite some of the drawbacks, there’s a net gain from involving volunteers in our work.

For information on the logistics of having for work experience students in your office, have a look at this guidance note.  It includes information on security and health and safety.  You can also read the information on safeguarding.  You may also find w4mp’s guide to Organising Work Experience in an MP’s Office useful.

There are a host of jobs which suit the skills and time availability of volunteers. Bear in mind a few principles and the arrangement can be mutually beneficial.

  • Manageable Tasks. Most volunteers come in for just a few hours a week so you need to give them manageable tasks which can be completed in that time.  Although some jobs – like culling the archived case files – are endless, make sure that volunteers don’t bite off more than they can chew and leave stacks of un-shredded papers lying around when they go.  You don’t want to have to finish the job when they’ve gone home.
  • Check Reliability. Say, for example you have given your volunteer the job of opening and sorting the post.  As you well know, it’s not just a simple job of opening envelopes and stamping the date received on it.  Sheets need to be fastened together, replies must be linked to existing files, invitations checked against the diary, Order Papers checked for PQs tabled by your MP, stacks of unwanted bumph separated from letters you must answer, etc.  That’s a skill it takes time to develop so it will pay you to tell them how you want it done and check it has been done correctly.  Otherwise, their work will be a drain on your time rather than a bonus.

Make sure volunteers know that their time is valued and that you expect to rely on them being there when they said they would.

  • Silence Please!  Make it clear, right from the start, that there’s work to be done and you don’t have time to sit and chat.  OK, be kind to yourself (and them) and do the chatting during a tea break!
  • What’s in it for the Volunteer?  Well, plenty actually.  A sense of involvement, achievement or helping out; perhaps some experience to be included on their CV (so get them to keep a running list of the tasks they undertake in case you need to write a reference later); and, hopefully, some genuine appreciation from you!
  • Confidentiality Agreement.  However well known the volunteer may be to you, he or she should sign a confidentiality agreement before starting work in your office.  It’s not just about guarding Party strategy.  You will inevitably handle very sensitive material about constituents from time to time and anyone working in the office will fall under the provisions of Data Protection Act 2018.  Here’s an example of a confidentiality agreement which you can use or adapt for your own office.  Let us know if you have an alternative agreement: use the Feedback Form.

Confidentiality Agreement

To be signed by all staff, volunteers, interns, secondees etc.

  1. Work undertaken in the office of _____________ MP involves access to information which is confidential. It should be treated as such and protected from unauthorised disclosure. It is an express condition of your relationship with ________________ MP that you should not divulge to any person outside the office of the MP any confidential information or aid the outward transmission of any such information or data.
  2. This undertaking continues after you cease to work for the MP.
  3. This undertaking applies to all material, including constituents’ casework, research, party political material, statistics, data, reports, etc.
  4. In the case of constituency casework, where it is necessary to relay information, letters, records of telephone conversations etc to third parties, this will always be done only in accordance with the interests of the constituent.

I have read this agreement and I understand and accept the above.

NAME _________________________________________________________

SIGNED  _______________________________________________________

WITNESS * _____________________________________________________

DATE __________________________________________________________

* line manager

Internships:  click here for all you need to know about a) becoming an Intern, and b) finding and looking after an Intern.

2.8 Registering Interests

When you first apply for a parliamentary pass, renew your pass, or change your sponsor you will be given a registration form to complete by the Pass Office.  A Resolution of the House requires that you register:
(1)  any relevant paid employment you are engaged in outside Parliament, and
(2)  gifts or other benefits which relate to your work in Parliament.

The Pass Office forwards the form to the Office of the Parliamentary Commissioner for Standards, where your details are added to the Register of Interests of Members’ Secretaries and Research Assistants.  You will be sent a copy of your entry then and whenever the entry is subsequently amended.  The Register is available for public inspection and is on the internet.  Members’ staff who are not issued with a parliamentary pass are not included on the Register, so if you have security clearance for access to the Parliamentary Network only, then you do not need to register.

Members’ staff may also be asked to assist their sponsoring Member in completing and maintaining his or her correct and up-to-date entry in the Register of Members’ Interests.  The Parliamentary Commissioner for Standards and Registrar of Members’ Interests are available to offer advice to Members and their staff on any aspect of registering and declaring interests.

The relevant telephone numbers are as follows:

Parliamentary Commissioner for Standards: 020 7219 0320
(Personal Assistant): 020 7219 0311
Registrar of Members’ Interests: 020 7219 3277
Assistant Registrar (for Members’ staff): 020 7219 0401

2.9 Health and Safety policy for constituency offices

There is an intranet page dedicated to Safety at Parliament, which may not be directly relevant to constituency offices but still contains some useful information.  There is also a page dedicated to Health and Wellbeing.

 2.10 Dealing with post and deliveries

Courier deliveries (e.g. Amazon, ASOS etc) cannot be made directly to the Parliamentary Estate, nor must passholders meet deliveries outside the Estate and then bring them in.  Deliveries present a huge security risk and these rules must be adhered to at all times.  If you must have items delivered to Parliament, please read the guidance here.